COVID-19 DIARY – ROLL OUT ROLL UP – PART VIII

U.K. rolls out 1st doses of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine | CBC News

May 18

Tuesday.

Five months and ten days after 90 year old Margaret Keenan got the first jab in the UK – my younger sister in London got vaccinated.

The good news didn’t stop there.

There was an opening and her husband walked up the road and got vaccinated as well.

WIth cases already occuring at their school again this was welcome news even if it would take time for the full protection offered by their Pfizer shot to take full effect.

The good news didn’t stop there, family over in Canada had also got vaccinated with Moderna.

News of people I cared about abroad getting vaccinated was a welcome relief and couldn’t have come soon enough.

In England another step was made in the lowering of restrictions.

Britons could now go abroad to Portugal and a few other limited countries.

Hospitality and tourism were back in business.

People walk at The Arcade shopping mall, amid the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Bedford town centre, Britain May 25, 2021. REUTERS/Paul Childs

Cinemas, restaurants, museusm and casinos as well as The London Eye were all open for business giving close to 1 million people a change to go back to work.

Theatre was back – The West End was open for the first time in 14 months.

Cases of the Indian variant in the country had double in the past 4 days reported Channel 9 News.

It was interesting to watch here in Australia. Britain had suffered more in case numbers and deaths than here in Australia and as a result had endured a more lengthy and stringent lockdown.

But international travel was still limited in Australia and while our theatres had opened up again without restrictions the number of cases were significantly less at the point those decisions were made then was the case currently in Great Britain.

It seemed and I would appreciate any commentary from my fellow British bloggers, that Britons had endured something and were enthuasiastic about their new freedom.

If there was a risk to enjoying it they felt they had endured enough to consider taking that risk. Maybe also an awareness that restictions could be lowered again.

Happy to hear your thoughts.

In the news was discussion about Queensland not having a mass vaccination hub with the Queensland Premier arguing the population was more decentralised. In the past 24 hours New South Wales and Victoria had each dispensed over 11,000 vaccine doses. Queensland and Western Australia had both been under three thousand each.

a man and a woman sitting at a table in front of a window: Chris Uhlmann sits down with Scott Morrison.

There was talk of a vaccine passport again, this time to allow more free travel between states during lockdowns for those who had been vaccinated.

All of those arrangements will have to be put in place,” said the Prime Minister acknowledging the power lay with the state governments.

[It’s them] who actually prevent Australians moving from one state to another consistent with their public health orders,” he said.

On international borders where the power lay with the Federal Government, the PM advised it would be a gradual process.

One step at a time and a risk that Australia can manage safely. It’s not closed one day, open the next. It will be tempered by the medical advice at every step,” Morrison said.

It’s not something that’s doable yet,” he added in regards to travellers quarantining at home after returning.

An 18 year old nursing student had been hospitalised with blood clots three weeks after receiving an AstraZeneca jab. It took five hospital visits to get properly diagnosed and it properly left her shaken.

Also in the news 47 year old Sydney father Govind Kant had passed away. A son who went back to his bury his mother in India, he was then unable to get a flight back before getting COVID. He recovered from the virus but his lungs were too damaged and he passed away. In the space of six weeks his family had lost a mother, a father and their brother.

-Lloyd Marken

ONE YEAR EARLIER: May 18, 2020

A truck driver who had tested positive to COVID-19  had made deliveries to twelve McDonalds while asymptomatic in Fawkner, Melbourne.

It was one year on since the Prime Minister Scott Morrison had won the election. In his first year as leader the devastating bushfires of the 19-20 Summer had occurred followed by COVID.

4 thoughts on “COVID-19 DIARY – ROLL OUT ROLL UP – PART VIII

  1. You will know by now that since you wrote this, Portugal was removed from the approved travel list, and the expected removal of restrictions in England didn’t happen. All more or less due to allowing returnees from India who brought the new strain back into the country with them. And that so Boris could crow about signing a ‘wonderful’ trade deal with India.
    We are still at the ‘peaks and troughs’ stage here, it would seem. Today, Andrew Lloyd Webber instigated legal proceedings against the government over restrictions of trade concerning the theatre industry. I can’t stand that weasel personally, but I can see him starting a trend of legal challenges against the restrictions.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    1. Thank you for not just sharing your thought but some pretty important news. Will be interesting to see how this wave plays out with a new variant and a highly vaccinated population. It might reveal how this plays out going forward. The arts are without doubt hurting but Webber’s lawsuit could set a dangerous precedent for discouraging a government that already has dragged its feet in in the past with measures to protect the populace. Best wishes Pete.

  2. The essential problem with England is that the country is vastly overcrowded so it doesn’t take much to put us back to where we were.
    And naturally, people who had had so many restrictions were very keen to get out and about once they had the chance. The problem was that initially many people did not bother wearing masks and young people especially were very lax with social distancing, Now, of course, there is the Indian variant which supposedly spreads more easily. I certainly have the feeling that there are still some bad times ahead, and it has been said that Covid may be with us until at least 2028.

    1. Thanks for sharing your thoughts John, it is appreciated. I can see COVID being around in 2028, hopefully in a different way but around. Here in Australia they are using the term “fleeting contact” to describe this new Indian variant spreading more easily. Take care John and thank you once again.

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